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20121101
20121130
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KNTV (NBC) 17
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English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
in a densely packed, tightly inhabited urban area, just across the hudson river from new york city, in hoboken, new jersey, correspondent katy tur has been covering there for us all day, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian, for the first time since monday night people are able to leave their homes to get a good sense of what the damage is. but the water is still very high in a number of these areas, and they're not expecting it to be fully gone until at least tomorrow night. 20,000 people trapped, hoboken became a virtual island as 500 million gallons of water overwhelmed the town. by wednesday morning the national guard came in to help, delivering much needed food and supplies to those still stranded. >> one thing we truly need is more fuel. >> reporter: the hoboken mayor. >> we need more fuel, resources, food so anybody who is listening to this in the city of hoboken or neighboring towns who can get to us, we ask you to come and deliver your supplies. >> reporter: as the length of this mixture of water, sewer, and oil turned into ponds, some got their first chance to assess the da
it this way, in new york city, people can't find gasoline, and some went to find food from dumpsters from the stores, because they have no power or water, and what the stores have is still good, although it needed to be thrown out. and since you're going to hear the memory of katrina invoked more and more in the coming days, like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island. ann curry has more. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and i
, in the center of new york city, transformed for thevening into democracy plaza. our nbc news election night headquarters. across this country today from the first light of day in montana, americans voted. they voted in temporary tents and by flashlight in the rockaways here in new york, where after all an entire region remains crippled and this will remain another cold, dark night for upwards of a million people. the first polls have already closed. more are closing in the next 30 minutes. people are still lining up to vote tonight in the state that may be the greatest prize of all, ohio. the candidates are spent after an exhaust iing campaign. now it all comes down to tonight. and just after midnight in keeping with a grand american tradition, the people of dixville notch, new hampshire cast the first votes in the nation and voted to a 5/5 tie. the first tie vote in that small town's history. we can only guess what that means for how late we'll be at this tonight. our team is in place all over the country and here in new york. we want to begin with our white house correspondent kristen wel
everything has come to a stop after an outpouring of suffering and rage, new york city cancels the marathon. >>> boiling point in one of the areas hardest hit by this storm. and the long lines for gas, some relief is on the way. >>> four days to go in the race for president. and tonight there is news on the jobs front. >>> and making a difference, step by step, 21 stories in the dark, one woman's mission to help those in need. nightly news begins now. >>> good evening, an entire region remains crippled and hurting tonight, life is far from normal for millions of people, including those in the most densely populated areas in the country, heading into the fifth night with no power, the death toll went over 100. while today in the air, we could see the first signs that the calvary is coming, vehicles, pallets, arriving in new york city, all day today, on top of the anger for those who have not received help yet, there was disbelief that the city of new york was going through with the marathon on sunday, a race to go through all five boroughs, in some places still flooded, and places where peop
in that state. nbc's katy tur is in the community of seabright, new jersey, not far from new york city to the south laupg new jersey. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, this is what you don't see very often, we have accumulation on the ground and flooding, here, it is three blocks wide at the widest, we have the ocean behind me and the river. it floods during nor'easter, and got hit hard during sandy, you can see it by the buildings behind me. now this town along the coast of new jersey is wondering what they will wake up to. ten days after hurricane sandy ripped apart the jersey shore, towns are scrambling to prepare for the first major winter storm and restore the battered coastline. mike seidel here this morning. >>> here at pleasant point beach they spent the day bringing sand out to the beach, building a dune twice as high but not as wide as the one wiped out by hurricane sandy. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie warned this nor'easter could stall the restoration effort. >> i hate setbacks, i don't tolerate them very well, but this one i can't control. the weath
, if you come visit us here in new york city over the holidays, you'll likely see just one of two cities. manhattan is glittering and bustling, and the streets are packed, the stores are packed and the tree out back is up. drive toward the coast, to the places on the water that were ruined by the storm three weeks ago, and you'll find that life has largely stood still. the good news, most people are finding a way to help their neighbors. that includes the rockaways on the coast of the south of here where a group of men all local dads who call themselves the gray beards are making a difference. their story tonight from nbc's katy tur. >> reporter: across the bay from the brightly lit new york city skyline, a donated generator powers a meeting of the gray beards. >> just knocking on every single door is not impossible. >> reporter: over a can of bud, this home grown charity is plotting a rockaway comeback. >> we have to remind people, we're all in the same boat. >> the group of 180 firefighters, cops, executives and lawyers are the guys who make new york city work. keep things safe, and si
are not livable. and today new york city mayor michael bloomberg extended the odd/even license gas rationing through the thanksgiving holiday. new york city building flp fors have already examined 2,000 homes and 900 are tagged with that tag that says seemingly unsafe. >>> rescuers have found the body of a man floating in the water on friday. one of the four men who suffered burns in the fire is improving and is now in fair condition. another is in serious condition and two remain crital. >>> still ahead, as nbc "nightly news" continues, forget black friday, this year they want you to stop until you drop even before the turkey is digested. >>> and then later, a surprise visitor drops into the sights of hundreds of troops in afghanistan. year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. i ho
made a new york city police officer something of a hero. the story behind the picture from nbc's stephanie gosk. >> reporter: in times square, visitors tend to look up, struck by the bright lights and billboards. but officer larry diprimo had his eyes on the streets, and on a homeless man in the street. in need of help. >> it was freezing, first thing i thought, this was absolutely unacceptable. i went up to him. i was like where are your socks or shoes or anything? >> reporter: he was on the counterterrorism beat when he saw the homeless man sitting right here with no shoes on. in that moment, he thought it was not just his job to protect, but also his job to serve. the most immediate need was obvious, and the shoe store was right there. jose conno was on shift. >> the officer was inspiring, i worked in the city for about ten years, and nobody has really taken this sort of initiative. >> reporter: conno cut him a deal on the water-proof winter boots, the officer paid with his own money. >> i think this is an important reminder that some people have it worse. >> reporter: jenni
accountability. >> reporter: even those whose job it is to heal need help. new york city will spend $4 billion to repair four hospitals and the schools damaged by the storm. today the city opened one stop recovery centers where victims can do everything from applying for aide to getting medical attention. >> many customers have been without power for a long time. rather than complain about it or write about it, we're trying to do something about it. >> reporter: the brooklyn battery tunnel is swamped with sea water finally reopened this afternoon. like the city itself, this 80 foot tall norway spruce, destined to delight millions of spectators athe rockefeller center is a survivor of sandy. it will be a symbol of holiday cheer and so much more. in new jersey tonight 5,000 customers remain without power. but today, that state ended its gas rationing program. here in staten island and throughout new york city. gas rationing remains in effect because only 60% of the city's gas stations are open. brian? >> anne thompson on staten island. one of the places where the suffering continues. anne, thank
in staten island and throughout new york city. gas rationing remains in effect because only 60% of the city's gas stations are open. >> anne thompson on staten island. one of the places where the suffering continues. >>> still ahead for us tonight, who has the energy to shop on thanksgiving night after turkey? well, retailers are betting enough highly motivated shoppers will make the trip to make it worth their while. >>> and later a surprising group of helpers on a new mission where help is really needed as we just saw. and they're making a difference 37 into their work, their name on the door, and their heart into their community. small business saturday is a day to show our support. a day to shop at stores owned by our friends and neighbors. and do our part for the businesses that do so much for us. on november 24th, let's get out and shop small. is the same frequent heartburn treatment as prilosec otc. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make thing
their town, a fury of fire and flood. new york city fire department assistant chief bob mains walked us through what is left on just this street, beach 130. >> this is a firefighter's home. >> reporter: dozens of homes were destroyed, but there were just as many heroes. among them the very humble ron cassar of engine 265 he dove under the rising water to find a hydrant and attach a hose. don't you feel as though maybe you did something extraordinary? >> nothing more than the other members of my -- company would do. across town, tommy in queens was working when they got a call, people trapped >> the water was this high, coming up to the top of the windshield. >> reporter: when they got there, there was not just water but a wall of fire. a river of water between them, he had to swim and then climb a building to get to those trapped >> one woman was pregnant, there were a minimum of six children. >> is there a possibility of getting a tower? amid the rains and fire, he brought people through the roof tops through an open window and out on to a rescue boat. >> this was not anything i have e
including staten island to bring relief. part of new york city's designated volunteer day to help the thousands still dealing with sandy's destruction and showing the victims that they are not alone. >> thank you for helping. i appreciate it. >> reporter: homeland security secretary janet napolitano is scheduled to be back tomorrow. this time to visit a disaster recovery site in staten island. meantime, residents here are still waiting for the power to come on. governor chris christie has pledged that power could be restored in all areas of new jersey by tonight. lester? >> michelle, thank you. >>> the united nations declared this malala day named for the 15-year-old pakistani girl shot by the taliban for, because she spoke out for the education of girls. today an outpouring of support for malala and her cause from around the world. that story from nbc's amna navaz. >> reporter: they chanted her name and carried her picture. fellow students in pakistan honoring malala. it's not only one, we are all malala. the whole of pakistan is malala. >> my message to the female students of th
-atlantic, well, today it felt like spring. a warm 66 degrees here in new york city, while parts of the west and midwest get blasted with cold-like winter, all of which is prompting people to ask yet again, what is with our crazy weather extremes? our report from our chief correspondent anne thompson. >> reporter: america has a case of weather whiplash >> 60 degrees as the high on friday, and then 28 degrees as the high on saturday. >> reporter: this weekend, the west went from summer to winter overnight. >> and that is winter. >> it is winter. >> reporter: today, the northeast enjoys the spring-like temperatures, still recovering from superstorm sandy, and the nor'easter that covered her debris in a record snowfall. >> this is something we've never seen before, any of the meteorologists here, for that matter. and it is something very, very unusual. >> reporter: you will get no argument from the people who have to deal with it. >> i am waiting for the locusts next. >> reporter: this region is dealing with the drought, the wildfires and the warmest month on record. in 2011, there were extreme
at an auction in new york city last night. >>> up nex making a difference for children's lives suddenly changed in a big way by the storm. ahmed jab humphries humph>>> we're back a for our "making a difference report" tonight. it may take a disaster like hurricane sandy to make kids feel how much they miss school. a lot of families have been uprooted, and neighbors are contributing as much as they can to get their sense of security back. our report tonight from nbc's rehema ellis. >> reporter: second graders from two schools in one classroom, brought together by disaster. >> hurricane sandy was like a tornado. and a storm. >> reporter: more than 400 students from this school on staten island have been relocated to the nearby petriti school. the principal of ps-52 says the generous people are overwhelming. >> this will allow them to heal more quickly. >> reporter: to make it happen took a village. >> everybody is absolutely working together from the custodians, to the security staff, the kitchen, the school aides, power professionals. >> reporter: conference rooms are now makeshift classrooms. l
was just getting started with her holiday shopping in new york city. >> not expecting to get a pair of boots but when you walk past these and they're only $30, how could you go wrong? >> reporter: just the attitude retailers are banking on that the crucial holiday shopping season off and running. >> i had to buy a suitcase to take home, because i've been shopping for about four days. don't tell anybody. >> reporter: the frenzy started on thanksgiving day when black friday early bird promotions turned into a feast for shoppers. those doorbuster deals on everything from flat screen tvs to must have toys, getting snapped up as consumers got swept up in the frenzy. sales are expected to grow a little over 4% this year with shoppers spending $586 billion. walmart released a statement calling it the best black friday ever. >> we had over 22 million customers in our store between 8:00 and midnight last night. >> reporter: macy's also saw record crowds. >> the line of incoming traffic never stopped, never ceased. >> reporter: as retail giants raked in the sales, small shop owners looked to
as a custodian at a new york city school. for close to 20 years, the kids at ps-87 knew him as the star of their school. earl carroll was 75. >>> men who are close to their in-laws are less likely to get divorced. this may seem like a common sense rule of the road to a lot of men, now it's science. this came out as actual research. men who remain close and get along with their wives' parents have a 20% lower divorce rate. strangely enough it's the opposite for women. when they're close to their in-laws the divorce rate goes up. the researchers say again, this is researchers saying this, that because many women interpret closeness with the in-laws as meddling by the in-laws. >>> our friends at the onion recently named kim jung-un their sexiest man alive for the year 2012. today the story was proudly picked up by the people's daily in china. what they didn't know about the onion, what we all know about the onion, the onion was only kidding. >>> up next, yoko ono in her own words on the breakup of the beatles and those rumors because of her. >>> tonight we get to hear something for the fir
california. it could last for days and many at a time. on this night of the year, especially, new york city continues to be a tale of two cities. just outside our studios, out back here tonight, thousands are packed into the plaza for the lighting of the rockefeller center christmas tree, always a glittering occasion, this time of year. but if you get in the car and drive to the shoreline to the beach communities of the rockaways, it is an entirely different story, a cold, dark night under curfew, since the big storm. nbc's katy tur is just one block where fire and water combined destroyed 111 homes. >> reporter: good evening, brian, people around here are talking about two things today. one of them is all the debris and dust like this, what it is doing to the air quality. that with the mold, the sewage, and is it safe to breathe? that is why you're seeing so many people around here wearing masks. in fact, doctors have seen more breathing problems since sandy hit. the others are the local businesses, we're on one street with the local businesses. the owners say nearly 1150 businesses in the
, it's not going to run out. >> in new york city, ferry sciee back online for tomorrow's commute. but for thousands still without power a crisis is emerging. >> one of the great fears we have with cold weather coming we have to make sure that people can stay warm and among the hardest hit, the rockaways in staten island. >> governmetonight the first ma donation from pepsico and walmart. >> reporter: in staten island, victims waited five days before help arrived. >> please start going door to door and ask some of the owners if they need anything. >> reporter: in queens more than 100 homes burned to the ground in a raging file fueled by sandy, a church service offered comforting words and a new determination. >> we don't have any crystal balls that will tell us how breezy point will be rebuilt. do not abandon your hope because only hope sustains us. >> reporter: volunteers and military teams continue to travel across the country to help in the recovery effort. the latest, 400 marines helping out in staten island. >> there is another big storm headed toward the region. we're joined
, and the difficulty of getting back to normal in some of the hardest hit areas, including here in new york city. nbc's stephanie gosk is with us tonight from brooklyn, stephanie, good evening? >> reporter: good evening, brian, we're in a place called the red hook initiative. it has become really a life line for the people in the community. we have been speaking with them all day long and they tell us after a week they are frustrated because there has been little improvement. there is no overstating the importance of a hot meal in red hook, brooklyn. a week after sandy hit and very few people in this low income neighborhood have electricity, and no one has heat. >> we just need power back, that is all. >> reporter: have you ever had to live like this? >> no. >> reporter: she lives just down the road, today, the power company was working on her house, but the water was the real problem. the basement was pumped three d days ago and then spilled again, until the power comes back. >> a long way to go, i'm on the last floor. >> reporter: she and her daughter, who struggles with asthma, have to hike up 18
's not what we heard in some hard-hit areas of new york city where storm victims claim the country's preeminent disaster relief organization has been missing in action. here's nbc's senior investigative correspondent lisa myers. >> reporter: two weeks after sandy hit, residents of breezy point, new york, still wonder if more help will ever arrive. >> we haven't seen red cross at all. red cross hasn't offered any assistance up until yesterday. >> reporter: carrie lynn allen says she's donated to the red cross before and is very disappointed. >> they take people's hardworking money to assist people. and then when push comes to shove, they don't assist. >> reporter: her neighbors also wonder what happened. >> the red cross, you know, they're normally a wonderful organization, and it's just that they're not here. >> reporter: ann marie willis coordinates volunteers in the community and rates the red cross performance here poor. >> they need help with everything from housing to just hold them, say you're going to be okay. you'll get through this. we need everything. and i know the red c
feet tall went for $75 million here at an auction in new york city last night. >>> up next, making a difference for children's lives suddenly changed in a big way by the storm. their name on the door, and their heart into their community. small business saturday is a day to show our support. a day to shop at stores owned by our friends and neighbors. and do our part for the businesses that do so much for us. on november 24th, let's get out and shop small. if you're a man with low testosterone, you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm treatment for low t. that's right, the one you apply to the underarm. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)